Sunday, March 17, 2013

WeWriWa Snippet - Regional Nonfiction

This week's snippet comes from my Amazon bestselling nature book, The ABC's of Oklahoma Plants!!

Farkleberry. Chrysothamnus nauseosus . Old Man’s Beard. Zanthoxylum clava-herculis. What do all of these farkling, nauseating, hairy clubs of Hercules have in common? They are all easily-identifiable plants found in Oklahoma, that's what!
 
 
Chapter A
Ash
Ptelea trifoliata
 
Stinking ash: What better way to start our botanical alphabet adventure than with a stinky tree, Latin name Ptelea trifoliata?
The Stinking ash, also known as Wafer ash, Skunk bush, or Hop tree, (not to be confused with hop frog) gets its name from the citrusy, musty smell that comes from crushing the twigs. Actually, all of this tree is pretty smelly.  
The Stinking ash can grow to be up to 25 feet (or two and a half stories!) tall, with its leaves rounding out the crown of the tree. The bitter bark comes in varying shades of gray.
Ususally when in the backcountry, the rule of thumb is, if it stinks and the birds don't eat it, you don't mess with it either. With the Wafer ash, this proves untrue because the tincture made from the roots of this tree can be used to treat an upset stomach.
 
I hope you enjoyed this part of my debut book that is now an Amazon bestseller!!  The ABC's of Texas Plants coming soon!!!
 
 

16 comments:

  1. Very interesting. I've always been facinated by herbs. I tweeted.

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    1. Thanks Ella! :-)That is so "tweet" of you to tweet! I am thrilled you like it! I plan to do one for all 50 states!

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  2. Such a unique voice. I enjoyed the read. Thank you for sharing.
    ~Summer
    My 8

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  3. Interesting! I'm the daughter of a forester who tried to educate me about trees, but I don't recall ever hearing about the stinking ash before. I'll have to see if they grow in Michigan.

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    1. Awesome Jess! I worked for the park and forest services before I had my four babies and my heart is still in the woods :-)

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  4. Interesting, loved the "voice." I can't wait to read the ones for the states I've lived in! A very different but terrific snippet!

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    1. Thanks Veronica! What states are those?

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  5. Love this book ~ can't wait for the Texas version. Congrats Ms. Bestselling Author!!!

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  6. I love the humor in this. Reminds me of The Punctured Thumb, my favorite book on cactus. Maybe I ought to try something with Alaskan flora.

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    1. Hey Sue Ann! Thanks for stopping by :-) Glad you liked my snippet, I will have to pick up a copy of The Punctured Thumb!! Sounds like my kind of read! On trying something with Alaskan flora ... you so should!!

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  7. Cool. Just proves that it's good for you if it smells bad. But I'm curious, have you ever tasted that tincture, Sara?

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    1. Thanks for the comment, Kate! I'm sorry to say there aren't any of the stinking ash trees growing in my neck of the woods, so I haven't tasted the tincture. I did do the cure mentioned in Chapter Z though ... and it does tingle!!

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  8. Really interesting stuff, Sara! I enjoy a bit of Botany, and pride myself on knowing what grows in field and woods around me. Lovely that you've written this book, and plan on Texas, next. :-)

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